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2015 Tshepong Blanket Drive
600+ blankets Blankets inTshepong + 500 more distributed in Vaal Area
Pre-School in Sharpeville receives PB stationery Packs
2014 June Sitselo Blanket Drive
purple bandage Sicelo 450 blankets distributed
2014 June Sicelo Blanket Drive
purple bandage sitselo 450 blankets distributed
2014 June Sonderwater Blanket Drive
purple bandage sonderwater over 600 blankets distributed
2014 Roshnee Football Club Tournamnet
purple bandage sponsored trophies & all proceeds from tea stall
2014 June Sonderwater Blanket Drive
purple bandage sonderwater over 600 blankets distributed
2014 June Sonderwater Blanket Drive
purple bandage sonderwater over 600 blankets distributed
2014 June Sonderwater Blanket Drive
purple bandage sonderwater over 600 blankets distributed
Jordan Trip 2015 - Hampers
PB - pack & distribute hampers to refugee families
Jordan Trip 2015 -Adopt an Orphan
PB team meets up with sponsored orphans In Jordan
Weillers Farm - Giving a new home to victims of shack fire
A brand new Zozo installed for family whose home burnt down in shack fire
Current campaigns 2016
2016 Blanket Drive & Abaya/Kurta Collection Drive

CAGE Prisoners in Roshnee

mBegg2014
mBegg2014
Vaal Muslim Women's Forum and Purple Bandage co-hosted a talk by Moazzam Begg, the director for the prisoner human rights organisation, CagePrisoners (now known as CAGE) to bring awareness of the plight of the illegally detained, tortured and oppressed prisoners languishing in jails around the world.

Moazzam Begg is one of nine British citizens who were held at Camp X-Ray, Guantánamo Bay by the government of the United States of America. Begg was labelled an ‘enemy combatant’ by the US government, imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit and whose precise nature has never been determined.

CAGE is an independent advocacy organisation working to empower communities impacted by the War on Terror. The organisation highlights and campaigns against state policies, striving for a world free from oppression and injustice.

CAGE has been campaigning against the War on Terror for more than a decade. Its work has focussed on working with survivors of abuse and mistreatment across the globe.

 

As part of a  countrywide tour initiated by the Muslim Lawyers Association, brother Muazzam Begg addressed the crowd with an inspiring talk.

 

While stories about the atrocities suffered by prisoners was heart-wrenching, it was the incidents about the level of faith and perseverance by the prisoners that were etched into the hearts of all present that day.


{EDITORS NOTE: Passport removed : After this trip to South Africa, - which had coincided with the funeral of Nelson Mandela – and where he spoke extensively about the complicity of the British government in rendition and torture, he was met upon arrival at Heathrow by officials who served him with a notice to seize his passport under the 'Royal Prerogative' stating that it was assessed his previous visits to Syria had constituted involvement in terrorism. No explanation other than that was given }

Read ore on Moazzam here : http://www.cageuk.org/case/2-moazzam-begg

The following has been taken off the CAGE website:

Moazzam was born in 1968 in Birmingham to secular Muslim parents. His mother died when he was six, and his father sent him to the Jewish King David School in Birmingham, because he thought it inculcated good values. Moazzam is fluent in English, Arabic and Urdu. In his 20s, Begg became more interested in politics. He never fitted one dogma neatly – conservative when it came to family values, leftist when it came to issues of equality. In the early 90s, between his job and studying law, he spent considerable time working in Bosnia as part of the relief effort. Moved by the plight of the Afghani people, in 2001 Begg travelled to Kabul with his family to start a school for basic education and provide water pumps. When the allied attack on Afghanistan began in October 2001, Begg and his family moved to Islamabad in Pakistan for safety.

Kidnapped in Pakistan, detained in Bagram and sent to Guantanamo

It was in Pakistan that he was seized in January 2002 by Pakistani police and CIA officers, bundled into a back of a car and taken back to Kabul, where he was held in a windowless cell at Bagram airbase for nearly a year – where he witnessed the death of two prisoners by US soldiers. After this, he was sent to Guantanamo Bay where he remained for two years – mostly in solitary confinement. During his time in custody.

MBegg Enemy Combatant
MBegg Enemy Combatant

Moazzam autographs his book for the PB team
Moazzam autographs his book for the PB team
Read more on Moazzam here : http://www.cageuk.org/case/2-moazzam-beggThe following has been taken off the CAGE website:

Moazzam was born in 1968 in Birmingham to secular Muslim parents. His mother died when he was six, and his father sent him to the Jewish King David School in Birmingham, because he thought it inculcated good values. Moazzam is fluent in English, Arabic and Urdu. In his 20s, Begg became more interested in politics. He never fitted one dogma neatly – conservative when it came to family values, leftist when it came to issues of equality. In the early 90s, between his job and studying law, he spent considerable time working in Bosnia as part of the relief effort. Moved by the plight of the Afghani people, in 2001 Begg travelled to Kabul with his family to start a school for basic education and provide water pumps. When the allied attack on Afghanistan began in October 2001, Begg and his family moved to Islamabad in Pakistan for safety.

Kidnapped in Pakistan, detained in Bagram and sent to Guantanamo

It was in Pakistan that he was seized in January 2002 by Pakistani police and CIA officers, bundled into a back of a car and taken back to Kabul, where he was held in a windowless cell at Bagram airbase for nearly a year – where he witnessed the death of two prisoners by US soldiers. After this, he was sent to Guantanamo Bay where he remained for two years – mostly in solitary confinement. During his time in custody he memorised large parts of the Quran. He was released on January 25, 2005 without charge though he received no explanation or apology.